Year 4 Transform Their Writing

Are talking and writing the

Educational expert Pie Corbett argues that you can’t write what you can’t first say. With this in mind, Rehoboth is pioneering a new writing course called Talk4Writing across our Primary Schools. So far, our Year 4 class at Wilson has started by learning, then modifying the text of ‘Little Red Riding Hood.’

Students started by doing a topical story, which was then marked and analysed to discover strengths and weaknesses in their writing. After that, students memorised and rehearsed the story of the model text (you can watch the class reciting the story together with appropriate actions in the video below!). The next step is to innovate their writing, using techniques that will help students improve their writing – in this unit we covered: adverbial phrases, similes, the power of three, and super sentences.

The transformation in their writing has been incredible. Students were able to incorporate these strategies into their writing and supercharge their ability to write well. Not only that, it has helped those that struggle with expressing themselves through writing a fresh approach.

Most of all, students have found this new method of learning fun.

It has been stretching for all of us to try something new. However, we know that for thousands of years we lived in an oral culture of storytelling. You can imagine the Israelites passing down stories across the generations of the mighty things God had done in their midst. These stories were written down faithfully and, as a result, we have the Bible to guide and inspire us every day.

Across England, schools that have embraced Talk4Writing have seen student results in writing increase by over 10%. At Rehoboth, we are hoping that this new approach to writing will see our students develop in skills, confidence and a greater enjoyment of writing.

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