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Visiting the Art Gallery of WA

This was a fantastic opportunity to encourage students to respect and celebrate differences between cultures and to think about the good that comes out of diversity.

“How does this artwork make me feel?”

“Do I like it?”

“Where are my eyes drawn to?”

These were all questions that students from the Year 4/5 class at Wilson pondered, while visiting the Art Gallery of Western Australia on 25 March.

The morning began with the class taking part in a workshop called Horizontal Geometries. For this activity they experimented with lines and shapes to create an artwork that represented our city. This tied in with our learning during Art about using line this term. The students did a wonderful job showing their understanding. They learnt about organic and geometric shapes and tried to use both in their artworks.

The sunshine was ‘glorious’ Mr Hunter exclaimed, so we enjoyed our morning tea on the grass outside. The children had a chance to run around and then we were on to the next activity!

Inside the Art Gallery again, we then separated into two groups and followed our friendly tour guides to explore the Balancing Acts exhibition. This exhibition showcases the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art and culture. There was a huge range of styles with many different materials used, ranging from inkjet print, to raw resin from the Balga (Grasstree). I was pleased that students could build on their learning in Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) this term. They learnt that the resin is not only used to help make tools, but also for waterproofing bokas (animal skins/cloaks) and mia-mias (shelters). They also thought about how the indigenous people made their paint and canvas, using the resources available to them.

After enjoying lunch, we divided into our two groups again and went on a Northbridge Walking Trail to discover some historical buildings that were important for early migrants. We saw lots of street art on the way such as murals and sculptures.

We met up with the rest of the class in Russell Square, then looked at the rotunda and sculptures. We tried to identify features which reflected the Aboriginal, European and Asian influence. The children had fun climbing on the playground. Then, it was time to make our way back to the bus.

This was a fantastic opportunity to encourage students to respect and celebrate differences between cultures and to think about the good that comes out of diversity. Mr Hunter and I enjoyed spending time with the students outside of the classroom and seeing them connect with each other whilst having fun learning. We are very proud of how the students conducted themselves during the excursion. The students were attentive listeners, thought carefully about questions and showed respect for the Art Gallery staff and the public.

Great work Year 4/5 class!

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